fulltimejobs.com

The Sky is the Limit !!

Required HL7 Developer

We are looking to hire HL7Developer 

Job Opening for HL7 Developer

No of Openings: 1

Functional Area: iOS Developer

Location: Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Start Date: 14/03/2014

Apply Now

iOS Application Developer required

We are looking to hire iOS Application Deeveloper

Job Opening for iOS Application

No of Openings: 1

Functional Area: iOS Developer

Location: Vadodara, Gujarat

Start Date: 14/03/2014

Apply Now

Fresher Jobs in Gujarat

Gujarat is one such state in India that is constantly developing. Many job openings are created on every day basis. People in this particular state is earning a good money and living a good standard of life.

 

In our portal Fulltimejobs we have bring our focus to this highly developed state of our country and trying to give opportunities to many job aspirants to get openings in various companies.

 This portal is a complete and one stop online job portal for the fresher jobs in Gujarat, those who have passed out and giving job interviews. Our website give all the information about the companies who are hiring fresher. Many leading companies as well as mid size companies are creating Fresher jobs in Gujarat. This is indeed a good news for the Fresher Applicants those who have desired to to work in the MNC Company as Software Developer jobs 2013.

 

The companies who are offering fresher jobs in Gujarat consider that applicants have sound and strong knowledge in the required profile for the Software Developer jobs. In this state there is no dearth of talent so it is important for the candidates to have a strong back ground in studies and they are expected to have qualifications of B.Sc/BE/B.Tech from any recognized Institute.

 

For the fresher It jobs in Gujarat the job seekers are not expected to know the real development side of the business, but they are expected to know the basic of every field that they have learned and taken degrees. Applicants are expected to have very good communications skills for the interaction with other team members and also with clients as and when required.  

 

For more details about fresher jobs in Gujarat and to apply for the respective jobs, applicants should go to our complete job portal www.fulltimejobs.com and get the full details about fresher jobs in Gujarat. 

How to Find Right Career Opportunity

Whether you’re leaving your school, you may find limited opportunities to get a job that can suit your profile or your education but the right career is out there for everyone.  You need to do lot of research about yourself first to realize your strengths, and acquire new skills, as well as master the courage to make a change, you can discover the career that’s right for you.

 Like many you may also think that the sole point of going for a job is to bring home enough money to live comfortably.  But it’s not the whole and true story, for the first few months you may enjoy the money but slowly fatigue will take over you, and you will start getting bored as this is not the job you wanted, and you are not satisfied. If you are unsatisfied with what you do every day, it takes a toll on your physical and mental health. You may feel burned out and frustrated, anxious, depressed, or unable to enjoy time at home knowing another workday is ahead. What’s more, if you don’t find your work meaningful and rewarding, it’s hard to keep the momentum going to advance in your career. You are more likely to be successful in a career that you feel passionate about.

Whether you’re looking to get a new job or planning for a job change, the first step to choosing a fulfilling career which actually can make you happy at the end of the day. 

So first think what really drives you and not think about “what pays the most” or “what is most secure,” especially in today’s economy. It’s important to first discover your primary interests and passions. This can open doors to careers that you might not have even thought of, which was inside you but you never bring out. Once you have that foundation, you can start fine tuning your search for the right career. You may be surprised at how you can fit your passions into a new career.

It’s always a challenge whenever you consider a huge change in your life, and there can be many reasons why you think changing careers is not possible.

Here are some common obstacles with tips on how to overcome them:

§  Changing careers for the better do take enough time to figure all pros and cons of a career change and make a plan how to go about it. But remember peace of mind is more important than big money.

§   If you have worked for a number of years, you may feel that you are old enough to change your career but it’s not true, is you have potential inside you, you can always change your career, age doesn’t matter.

 

§   You may be unaware of the skills you have sometimes, or low self-esteem may lead you to underestimate your marketability. Either way, you probably have more skills than you think. Consider skills you’ve learned not only from your job but also from hobbies, volunteering, or other life experiences.  So never feel low and always take up new opportunities.

 

Find more Jobs on in.fulltimejobs.com

Employment Opportunities in India

One of the clear signs of India’s emerging status as a knowledge economy is the fact that today India has better employment avenues that can prevent an exodus of intellectual capital

 

“Now with improved monetary prospects and scope for cutting edge work, Indian organisations are a big draw for bright and promising minds,” says Shekhar Sanyal, country head, IET (Institution of Engineering and Technology), India. He elaborates, “A decade back engineering firms in India largely (if not wholly) engaged in testing work for global engineering projects. But today Indian engineering firms provide opportunities for sophisticated R&D, innovation and high-end design.

 

Substantiating Sanyal’s observation, Anand Pattani, associate vice president, Black & Veatch, says, “For more than 40 years Black & Veatch has been working in India, undertaking projects like power generation and water and sanitation that enhance quality of life and support economic development. During this period we have seen notable changes. Previously, Indian engineers may have had to seek work overseas to gain experience of things which are at the top of the value chain. However, now we are able to support their career development within our India offices, with the opportunity to work on global projects. In recent years, we have recruited significant numbers of highly skilled Indian engineers and designers to work in our Mumbai and Pune offices. The figure has grown from 245 in 2007 to the current figure of nearly 400. In addition to supporting Black & Veatch’s work for clients across the world, they are supporting critical human infrastructure projects in India.”

 

There’s a similar story in the domain of management. “In the fast-mushrooming venture capital and private equity funded organisations there is an increasing need for top talent, particularly at the middle and higher echelons of management,” says Himanshu Aggarwal, CEO and director, Aspiring Minds, a Noida-based employability measurement firm. A pronounced emphasis on professionalism, lucrative remuneration and, most importantly, the opportunity to do work at par with the work in developed countries is making India Inc a preferred choice for management graduates from leading Indian b-schools.

 

While on one hand the relatively newfound emphasis on retaining talent is translating to a slew of training and development initiatives, on the other hand the concept of drawing career roadmaps for high performing employees in a consultative manner is gaining ground. This is contributing to compound the appeal of India Inc. “This appeal is not just restricted to Indians. There are numerous instances of expats coming to India for internships which speak volumes about our growing standards both in terms of work and corporate culture,” shares Aggarwal.

 

And it is not just the employment prospects that are attractive for management graduates. Entrepreneurship is another turf that is brimming with potential. “While there is a dearth of infrastructure — supply chains for instance — one cannot discount the fact that it is a lot easier to establish proof of concept (meaning demonstrated worth of the idea) in India as compared to many other countries simply because the fiscal requirement for setting up enterprises is significantly lesser,” observes Aggarwal. “The existing disadvantages can in themselves translate to individual entrepreneurial opportunities. And people are realising this, which explains the upsurge of start-ups specialising in e-supply chains that are engineered to provide innovative, cost-effective and real time solutions to various business challenges,” he adds.

 

The Employability Factor

 

This story of ‘India Inc shining’ is one part of the assurance that the country is marching towards a knowledge economy. The other side of the assurance lies in the employability quotient of our overall pool of engineers and managers. And here the facts are far from heartening.

 

“Less than 25% of our engineers are not employable,” informs Shekhar Sanyal, country head, IET (Institution of Engineering and Technology), India. In fact, according to a recently published report by Aspiring Minds, (basis AMCAT, which is one of India’s largest employability tests) more than 25% engineers do not even possess the English comprehension skills required to understand engineering school curriculum and only 57% engineers can write grammatically correct sentences in English. And yes, there is an intrinsic connection between engineers and managers as a considerable number of managers have engineering degrees. So what is ailing our education system and how can the problem be rectified so that we have a qualified workforce?

 

“The curriculum of an IIT or any other engineering school is pretty much the same. The problem lies in the selection criteria. Many engineering colleges of our country have no commitment to quality when it comes to screening potential students. All that they are interested in is filling their intake capacity,” says Sanyal. He goes on to say that engineering schools have to look beyond textbooks and involve the students in more rigorous practical assignments.

 

Adding to this, Aggarwal says, “Part of the problem lies in the fact that many engineering colleges are just keen to achieve 100% placement records. In that bid, students do not feel the need to study really hard and develop a knowledge base. Passing exams and securing a job becomes the obvious thing to do. Organisations can step in here and reverse this complacent mindset. For one they can incentivise performance in certain hardcore technical domains that in turn will encourage academic rigour in colleges.”

 

 

 

Employment Opportunities in India

One of the clear signs of India’s emerging status as a knowledge economy is the fact that today India has better employment avenues that can prevent an exodus of intellectual capital

 

“Now with improved monetary prospects and scope for cutting edge work, Indian organisations are a big draw for bright and promising minds,” says Shekhar Sanyal, country head, IET (Institution of Engineering and Technology), India. He elaborates, “A decade back engineering firms in India largely (if not wholly) engaged in testing work for global engineering projects. But today Indian engineering firms provide opportunities for sophisticated R&D, innovation and high-end design.

 

Substantiating Sanyal’s observation, Anand Pattani, associate vice president, Black & Veatch, says, “For more than 40 years Black & Veatch has been working in India, undertaking projects like power generation and water and sanitation that enhance quality of life and support economic development. During this period we have seen notable changes. Previously, Indian engineers may have had to seek work overseas to gain experience of things which are at the top of the value chain. However, now we are able to support their career development within our India offices, with the opportunity to work on global projects. In recent years, we have recruited significant numbers of highly skilled Indian engineers and designers to work in our Mumbai and Pune offices. The figure has grown from 245 in 2007 to the current figure of nearly 400. In addition to supporting Black & Veatch’s work for clients across the world, they are supporting critical human infrastructure projects in India.”

 

There’s a similar story in the domain of management. “In the fast-mushrooming venture capital and private equity funded organisations there is an increasing need for top talent, particularly at the middle and higher echelons of management,” says Himanshu Aggarwal, CEO and director, Aspiring Minds, a Noida-based employability measurement firm. A pronounced emphasis on professionalism, lucrative remuneration and, most importantly, the opportunity to do work at par with the work in developed countries is making India Inc a preferred choice for management graduates from leading Indian b-schools.

 

While on one hand the relatively newfound emphasis on retaining talent is translating to a slew of training and development initiatives, on the other hand the concept of drawing career roadmaps for high performing employees in a consultative manner is gaining ground. This is contributing to compound the appeal of India Inc. “This appeal is not just restricted to Indians. There are numerous instances of expats coming to India for internships which speak volumes about our growing standards both in terms of work and corporate culture,” shares Aggarwal.

 

And it is not just the employment prospects that are attractive for management graduates. Entrepreneurship is another turf that is brimming with potential. “While there is a dearth of infrastructure — supply chains for instance — one cannot discount the fact that it is a lot easier to establish proof of concept (meaning demonstrated worth of the idea) in India as compared to many other countries simply because the fiscal requirement for setting up enterprises is significantly lesser,” observes Aggarwal. “The existing disadvantages can in themselves translate to individual entrepreneurial opportunities. And people are realising this, which explains the upsurge of start-ups specialising in e-supply chains that are engineered to provide innovative, cost-effective and real time solutions to various business challenges,” he adds.

 

The Employability Factor

 

This story of ‘India Inc shining’ is one part of the assurance that the country is marching towards a knowledge economy. The other side of the assurance lies in the employability quotient of our overall pool of engineers and managers. And here the facts are far from heartening.

 

“Less than 25% of our engineers are not employable,” informs Shekhar Sanyal, country head, IET (Institution of Engineering and Technology), India. In fact, according to a recently published report by Aspiring Minds, (basis AMCAT, which is one of India’s largest employability tests) more than 25% engineers do not even possess the English comprehension skills required to understand engineering school curriculum and only 57% engineers can write grammatically correct sentences in English. And yes, there is an intrinsic connection between engineers and managers as a considerable number of managers have engineering degrees. So what is ailing our education system and how can the problem be rectified so that we have a qualified workforce?

 

“The curriculum of an IIT or any other engineering school is pretty much the same. The problem lies in the selection criteria. Many engineering colleges of our country have no commitment to quality when it comes to screening potential students. All that they are interested in is filling their intake capacity,” says Sanyal. He goes on to say that engineering schools have to look beyond textbooks and involve the students in more rigorous practical assignments.

 

 

Adding to this, Aggarwal says, “Part of the problem lies in the fact that many engineering colleges are just keen to achieve 100% placement records. In that bid, students do not feel the need to study really hard and develop a knowledge base. Passing exams and securing a job becomes the obvious thing to do. Organisations can step in here and reverse this complacent mindset. For one they can incentivise performance in certain hardcore technical domains that in turn will encourage academic rigour in colleges.”